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When Can I Drive Again? Persistent Drunk Driving and Interlock

drunk-driving

The most important detail to know about any DUI or DWAI charge is that we are talking about two different paths: the criminal case prosecuted by the district attorney and the administrative case reviewed by the Colorado Department of Revenue. Both sides have the ability to revoke or suspend your driving privilege in different ways. A case dismissal on the part of the district attorney does not mean a dismissal by an administrative law judge, and vice versa. Don’t even bother bringing up what happened at your Department of Revenue DMV hearing to the district attorney when you’re in plea negotiations. Each agency does what they want with your case.

Are you a Persistent Drunk Driver (PDD)? This is a label the Department of Revenue will give you if you picked up a DUI charged after January 1, 2014 and your blood alcohol level was a .15 or higher. If you picked up a DUI charge after 1/1/2014 and you refused to take a chemical test (blood test or Intoxilyzer breath test), you will also be slapped with a PDD label. If you are designated a Persistent Drunk Driver after 1/1/2014, you will be required to have an interlock device installed on your car for a minimum of two years if you want to drive at all. This is after you’ve served the period of suspension which is typically 30-60 days and you have purchased SR-22 insurance. The interlock device (aka “blow and go”) attaches to your car’s ignition and requires you to blow into a tube for several seconds to test your breath for alcohol. Once the device determines you are clear to drive it will beep at you and you’re free to start driving. Every 10-15 minutes of driving the device will beep for a follow up test. You can blow into the device while driving, but use caution because it can be a distraction. If you fail the test or it results in error from incorrectly blowing or not using enough breath, your call will stop running.

The interlock device requires regular calibration at a designated service center every 30 to 60 days which costs between $70 and $90. A printout is mailed to the Department of Revenue indicating all testing results. You can usually remove the device after the 2 year period with clean driving and no positive test results. You’ll get notification from the Department of Revenue saying you’re free to drive normally again. If the device detects alcohol on the driver in three of any twelve consecutive months, the interlock restricted driver must keep the interlock device and be under the interlock restriction for an additional year.