Aurora Theater Massacre Jury Selection

dark knight risesJuly 20, 2012 just 18 minutes into the new movie “The Dark Knight Rises” gunfire was opened on the audience. The gunman was dressed in head-to-toe protective gear and many movie goers thought it was part of the movie until the gunman released two tear gas canisters up the aisles of the movie theater. After the canisters exploded, the gunman started firing at the audience. Police recovered an AR-15 rifle, a 12-gauge shotgun and two .40-caliber handguns. 12 people were killed and dozens more injured by the gunman who was taken into police custody minutes later known as James Holmes who was 24 years old at the time.

It is very rare to have a mass shooter in court as most either commit suicide or are killed by the police but James Holmes’s was taken into custody, charged and his trial has started. On January 20, 2015 jury selection began from 9,000 prospective jurors. It is the largest jury pool in U.S history. Of the prospective 9,000 jurors 1 of 50 registered voters in Arapahoe County had a chance of being selected. The prospective jurors will arrive in groups of 250 twice a day and will be asked to complete an 18 page questionnaire. Potential jurors will be called back for individual questioning which is a process that can take up to 4 months to complete. 100 potential jurors will be left after this process and will be questioned in a group session. The jury will consist of the final 12 jurors and 12 alternates which may not be complete until May or June with the trial lasting until October.

James Holmes has been charged with multiple counts of murder and attempted murder and has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity. If found guilty, jurors will have to decide whether to recommend the death penalty. If found not guilty Holmes would be committed to a mental hospital indefinitely. The case has gone on for so long as the prosecution and the defense are trying to determine if Holmes was insane at the time of the shooting as defined under the Colorado law. Insanity as defined by Colorado law (C.R.S. § 16.8.-101.5) is The person must be “diseased or defective in mind.” This is typically translated as having a mental illness (almost always a psychotic thought disorder like Schizophrenia or Schizoaffective Disorder). To be considered mentally diseased or defective, a condition must “grossly and demonstrably impair a person’s perception or understanding of reality.”

Check back for updates as the trial gets underway. Jury selection is expected to take several months.

by Brittney Jones, Paralegal

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